web analytics

Canterbury by night and day…

On July 19, 2009

I have yet to find a town in England that wasn’t worth a wander but Canterbury, ah, Canterbury – not a dollar is needed to meander its streets day or night and find structures and snippets of interest everywhere.

The meandering started after our return to Canterbury following the surprisingly delightful bat & trap competition. It is impossible for me to encapsulate in a short blog the incredible history of this town – to begin with, my knowledge of that history is meager but to walk the streets is to know you are in the presence of hundreds of years of important events and people and equally as important you are in a town where the common way of life has also survived for hundreds of years. For instance, we bookended our evening and morning walks around Canterbury with a stop at

The Three Tuns

The Three Tuns

which first opened as a pub in the mid-1500s (although at the moment it sadly appears to be temporarily closed),

And this pub is not a singular structure, at almost every turn there is a building which either at street level or in precious saved stories above is equally as old.

Woodwork above Nero Coffee dating from 1573...

Woodwork above Nero Coffee dating from 1573…

The Bell and Crown, a mere child at only 150 years old

with its list of innkeepers and Archbiships.

with its list of innkeepers and Archbiships.

No. 28 Palace Street

No. 28 Palace Street

And, above it all, the glorious Canterbury Cathedral…

Spires rising above the Cathedral Gate and a Starbucks

Spires rising above the Cathedral Gate and a Starbucks

and the Gap

and the Gap

and above the roofs

and above the roofs

although the ridiculously rich religious history of Canterbury is also told in something as simple as a sidewalk paver reading

Knights Templars

Knights Templars

and in the magnificent Old Synagogue built in 1848 on land that was originally home to the Jewish community of Canterbury in the 13th century

Old Synagogue, King Street

Old Synagogue, King Street

Encircling the city center are the city walls of which almost fifty percent remain…

View of city wall from Danes Mound

View of city wall from Danes Mound

Many portions of the wall are so well preserved that you almost feel as though you could pick up a bow and send an arrow gliding through the slit windows of the archers’ stations…

An archer's nook

An archer’s nook

but you wouldn’t want to do that, because you might hit a commuter waiting for the bus…

Bus terminal below the city walls

Bus terminal below the city walls

Then from the streets we made our way into what has been the town’s center for centuries

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *